Candida Girling

Candida Girling – Green wall intervention

Candy Girling green wall

My thesis project aims to address the juncture and disjuncture of the contemporary urban environment and the natural world. Today’s city is characterized by the triumph of consumer culture, with its attendant pollution, alienation and diminished green space. We may respond by creating micro-environments that insert nature into the equation and thus allow and encourage dreaming and contemplation in places unmediated by advertising.

For the project I have created an installation that functions both as a sculpture and as a hydroponic green wall. My hope is to make an intervention in the urban landscape by establishing a mobile haptic space.

Nature often runs its’ own course in the city.The pervasive weeds that magically appear in cracks in the sidewalk are reasons for joy rather than lamentation. They act as indicators of disturbances in the natural habitat and serve as reminders of the clemency of Nature, which survives despite our attempts to pave over it.

What would the world be, once bereft
Of wet and of wildness? Let them be left,
O let them be left, wildness and wet;
Long live the weeds and the wilderness yet

Gerard Manley Hopkins

Augustina Droze

My current body of studio work illustrates my use of meditation as a coping mechanism for stress and the rhythmic trance-like effect that repeated imagery has on the mind. I have focused on the theme of reproduction, influenced heavily by my recent experience of pregnancy and birth and my reliance on mediation as a survival coping mechanism to work through the various layers of anxiety that accompanied it. Using organic subjects such as fish, birds, cells, plants and insects in groupings I investigate the theme of regeneration and the obsession at the macro and micro levels. The rhythmic quality of the identical items causes the viewer to become lost in the compulsive arrangement and transported to a transient state, similar to the destination I turned to in desperation through the process of childbirth. Different species are used as metaphors for phases of the reproductive cycle: birds signifying trophy and transcendence, fish represent sacrifice, and insects illustrate anxiety and ephemerality. The imagery is arranged in various groupings of multiples, each composition speaking to the emotive quality of the organic object. The items are rendered at varying levels of realism, from realistic paintings to childish stuffed animal representations. The tedious craftsmanship involved in the multiplication of the objects is in itself a coping strategy as I continue to battle through the challenges of childbirth and motherhood.

Julie Rozman

Philosophically, politically, and conceptually, I’m pursuing forms of resistance to and negation of particular qualities that mark our lives – most notably its constant demands for reason and accompanying fast pace. Absurdity, play, arbitrariness, randomness, the non-rational, the non-logical, and slowness are important.

Aesthetically, I have tendencies toward a minimal and subtle visual aesthetic, poetic language, minimalism of ideas and vocabulary, quietness, stillness, low chroma, the water, landscape, abstraction, the sublime.

My research has been on situation-specificity as site-specificity, ontologies and blurred boundaries, and embodied experience.

Lots of images in addition to the words.

Image from project: Of a ship: let looking be as drinking, for a clear western sky, darkening by fractions over miles beyond sunset, video loops and archival inkjet prints, length and size variable, 2013-2014

Image from project: Of a ship: let looking be as drinking, for a clear western sky,
darkening by fractions over miles beyond sunset, video loops and archival inkjet prints,
length and size variable, 2013-2014

Composite of images: Of a ship: let looking be as drinking, for a clear western sky, darkening by fractions over miles beyond sunset, video loops and archival inkjet prints, length and size variable, 2013-2014.

Composite of images: Of a ship: let looking be as drinking, for a clear western sky,
darkening by fractions over miles beyond sunset, video loops and archival inkjet prints,
length and size variable, 2013-2014.

Other recent work to give a broader sense of my creative output:

Untitled (Egg Piece, May 2013), archival inkjet print, 24"x15", 2013.

Untitled (Egg Piece, May 2013), archival inkjet print, 24″x15″, 2013.

Untitled (Two Mornings), archival inkjet print, 24"x18", 2013.

Untitled (Two Mornings), archival inkjet print, 24″x18″, 2013.

from An Inadequate Demonstration of Brownian Motion, archival inkjet print, 2013-2014.

from An Inadequate Demonstration of Brownian Motion, archival inkjet print, 2013-2014.

from An Inadequate Demonstration of Brownian Motion, archival inkjet print, 2013-2014. Series of 36 images.

from An Inadequate Demonstration of Brownian Motion, archival inkjet print, 2013-2014. Series of 36 images.

Untitled (121103 Ashtabula), 34-minute video loop, installation variable, 2012.

Untitled (121103 Ashtabula), 34-minute video loop, installation variable, 2012.

Untitled (four hours of a perfect silver sky outside my studio window), Buffalo, New York, 25 January 2013, four hour video loop, installation variable, 2013.

Untitled (four hours of a perfect silver sky outside my studio window), Buffalo, New
York, 25 January 2013, four hour video loop, installation variable, 2013.

 

I’ve organized and curated an exhibition called Yoko Ono Fan Club which is another way of forwarding and exploring a constellation of concepts that overlaps heavily with the aforementioned. The submissions include a range of performance documentation, objects, manifestos, wordplay, installations, scores, instructions, and performances, and challenge boundaries among ideas of what’s serious, silly, absurd, everyday, or surreal. The show is on view through March 29, 2014, in the Visual Studies Gallery – 2nd floor of the CFA.

Bobby Gryzynger

cc_showcard_front

My thesis exhibition is called Cloud Cafe. I will be running Big Orbit Gallery as a fully functional cafe. Within this environment I will be suspending about 100 handmade, incandescent light bulbs and hanging three projection screens. The screens will display image data passing over the gallery’s open wireless network. I have written a computer program capable of conducting surveillance on the gallery’s wireless network. The program targets images and intercepts them as a viewer using the network requests them from a webpage or mobile app. When there is image data passing over the network, portions of the light bulb element will illuminate, indicating the activity is taking place. The light bulb element will operate in real-time while the images will be displayed at regular intervals. Viewers will be invited to come to the space with their electronic devices and to treat the space as they would any other cafe.

My project intends to engage the following:

TECHNOLOGY AS BOTH AWE-INSPIRING & TROUBLING

We are impressed by the scope and convenience of contemporary technology but also troubled by its capabilities and implications. My project attempts to engage this aspect through its surveillance element.

THE USER/MAKER DISTINCTION

Most who use contemporary technologies remain users rather than users and makers of technology; this creates a power-dynamic ripe for exploitation. My project addresses this through utilizing technology both new (digital networks/media) and old (incandescent light bulbs). Incorporating both is a gesture to engage with technology at a very deep level, requiring me to have a command of electronic technologies at a level many never see fit to explore.

THE CULTURE OF SHARING

Contemporary technology, especially social media, has encouraged us to share an increasing amount of ourselves publicly. This is justified both in terms of the convenience it affords us as well as with a general “bandwagon” mentality. However, in light of recent (and on-going) revelations, it is increasingly apparent that we need to reevaluate just how much of our private lives we are comfortable with bleeding into the public domain.

This is where the cafe itself comes into play. It is a public environment that operates under the assumption of some degree of individual, personal privacy. My project attempts to subvert this dynamic by stripping away much of the assumed digital privacy of the environment in hopes of prodding viewers to question their relationship with contemporary technology.

Su Yang

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My research is to combine my academic studies on feminism with my art practice. For the graduate thesis solo show, my paintings are about the women who are pre or undergoing the cosmetic surgeries, or in the recovery period of the surgeries. Cosmetic surgery is a kind of new theme for painting. And cosmetic surgery has been discussed by feminists and is related to the philosophy of body. The painting about this theme can be a kind of innovation.

I paint oil paintings and traditional egg tempers. By oil, I like to paint in expressionist ways, bright colors and bold strokes. But meanwhile, I paint the details in realist ways to show the real scene of cosmetic surgeries. So there is as much reality as there is expression in my art. Additionally, for tempera works, I use the traditional process instead of using materials in stores. It is a challenge to combine the tradition technique with contemporary theme. Oil paintings and tempera works both show the desensitized nature of reconstruction surgery, and the subsequent trauma and suffering of the body. The oil paintings are around 70 by 70 inch, and the tempera works are 12 by 12 inch.

I painted the scenes from medical books in the past. But right now, I make up myself like a woman in cosmetic surgeries according to my interest and the need of the light, composition of paintings and the visual effects. This is better than the medical records or shooting the photos of the real scenes which might not suit to paint or to express by paintings.

Heather Kurdyla

Taking the same approach to my previous work, I will be similarly recreating domestic spaces for my thesis show. The piece will consist of three 1950′s style living room installations.   All materials for the installation are being collected and curated to fabricate an authentic representation of the 1950s aesthetic.  Additionally, I will be constructing narratives in each room to disrupt and disturb the idealized space. By utilizing an era romanticized by American culture, the work questions society’s ideals both historically and contemporarily. I aim to create an engaging and unsettling installation while creating a discourse on issues of gender, class, and race.

a fly in the ointment-  something that spoils a good situation

*Because the piece will not be completed until I get into the space, I included a photo of my previous work to get an idea of what the installation will look like and of my studio that is now a furniture warehouse.

livingroom01 livingroom02 livingroom03

Liza LaBarge

My work emerges from a conjunction of realism with surrealism, presenting overly dramatized theatrical scenes. These large-scale charcoal drawings are highly influenced by the Freudian uncanny, where the familiar and foreign converge. Each piece strives to create a unique environment for the audience, where cognitive dissonance is enhanced through the paradoxical flux between attraction and intimidation. The work offers a glimpse into ambiguous narratives of femininity, which positions the audience as voyeur.

 

This series is stylistically influenced by Caravaggio and Artemisia Gentileschi. The aesthetics of detailed rendering and dramatic lighting combine with the engaging gaze of the figures to draw the viewer close, while the disturbing subject matter and surreal juxtaposition of imagery, create a sense of unease. By formulating ideas derived from imagery commonly used throughout art history, my recent work appropriates Classical religious and mythological compositions in order to create contemporary allegories that emphasize the female figure. Each piece focuses on a different issue surrounding womanhood that I believe is relevant in today’s society.  I aim to raise questions regarding psycho-social power dynamics, cult mentality, domesticity, and reproduction. I am interested in how the image of the woman’s body can be presented as both abject and object: simultaneously signifying male fear and desire. Laura Mulvey states, “the look, often pleasurable in form, can be threatening in content, and it is woman as representation/image that crystallizes this paradox.” I present the woman as simultaneously submissive and domineering in order to subvert the dichotomous cliché representation of woman as virgin/whore or angel/devil. I hope to engender new compelling ways of looking and new subversive ways of seeing the female figure.Annunciationbees close-up

Mark Snyder

Dragster

Death Drives A Dragster

As soon as I was old enough to work I took a job so I could buy a car. The first car I bought was a dragster.
It was a 1965 Plymouth Satellite that the owner used to drag race until he broke his back. I bought the car in a form that was ready to race but with no motor. So the second car I bought was my dad’s Plymouth Fury III. I knew nothing really mechanical about cars but figured I could put my Dad’s engine in my car. Out of sheer luck and the kind of ignorance that allows you to do things you don’t know you can’t, I managed to merge two completely incompatible cars into one car, my car.
For my thesis show I will be building a dragster. At this time I have no idea whether it will function or not, but this kind of unknowing attempt is rudimentary to my general processes. The Dragster will be modeled after the early 1970′s style of a front-engine, sling-shot design. With its straight-line speed and a driver’s need for complete focus on the goal, the dragster represents a part of America from my youth that I feel has faded. As children we are indoctrinated into societal norms through our schools, in neighborhoods and via T.V.  Wide World of Sports use to broadcast Evel Knievel jumps into our living rooms. And with friends we would attempt bicycle versions in our front lawn. Living on a street with a hill meant that we would also race anything that would move down it from tricycles to skateboards to go-carts. When my friends and I got old enough we all bought cars. Cars represented freedom, mobility and escape. Fast cars represented, skill, daring and need to run the razors edge between life and death; a fatalistic drive, a need to crush out things one did not want to think about or to crush out ones own life.